Okanagan Lake levels for 2018: Less than 1 cm increase for the 1st time in May

NowMedia Staff | May 25, 2018 in Flood Watch

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UPDATE: May 25, 2018 @ 6:45 a.m.

Over the past 24 hours, we have seen less than a 1 centimetre (0.9 cm) increase in Okanagan Lake bringing the new level to 342.643 metres, 0.163 (6.412 inches) over the full pool target, and 0.608 m (1.99 feet) lower than last year's historic flood level of 343.251 m set on June 9, 2017.

The less than 1 cm increase was lowest increase for the month of May as the pattern continues for smaller and smaller increases. 

Outflows at Okanagan River remain at 58.4 cubic metres per second, which is near the deemed capacity outflows of 60 cubic metres per second. 

The observed snowpack is reporting at 86 cm this morning.

The Mission Creek reporting station is showing outflows into Okanagan Lake at 44.4 cubic metres per second. 

For comparison - Last year as of May 25, 2017:

The snowpack level was at 130 cm. (higher than May 24, 2017, it still snows in May at high elevations)

Okanagan Lake rose 2 cm increase to bring the level to 342.98 m.

The Mission Creek reporting station outflows were at 48.6 cubic metres per second.

If there is more information you would like to see in the daily update or if you just want to provide feedback, you can email news@KelownaNow.com.

Link to our 2017 flood watch daily update story.

The flooding concerns in Osoyoos are easing which allows for increased outflows back into Okanagan River. Our story from PentictonNow can be read by clicking this headline  "Osoyoos council informed flooding concerns finally diminishing as lake levels drop"

Graph: Show Okanagan lake levels from Jan 1, 2017 to May 25. 2018

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 25, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 25, 2018.

UPDATE: May 24, 2018 @ 6:45 a.m.

Over the past 24 hours, we've seen a 2.2 centimetre increase in Okanagan Lake bringing the new level to 342.634 metres, 0.154 m (6.06 inches) higher than the full pool target and 0.617 m (2.02 feet) less than the 2017 historic flood level.

Outflows have increased to 58.4 cubic metres per second from 53.8 cubic metres per second yesterday into Okanagan River. We are now very close to deemed maximum capacity outflows of 60 cubic metres per second.

The observed snowpack is reporting at 91 cm this morning.

The Mission Creek reporting station is showing outflows at 39.4 cubic metres per second.

For comparison - Last year as of May 24, 2017:

The snowpack level was at 119 cm. 

Okanagan Lake rose 5 cm increase to bring the level to 342.96 m.

The Mission Creek reporting station outflows were at 43.9 cubic metres per second.

If there is more information you would like to see in the daily update or if you just want to provide feedback, you can email news@KelownaNow.com.

Link to our 2017 flood watch daily update story.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 24, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 24, 2018.

UPDATE: May 23, 2018 @ 6:45 a.m.

A small 2.1 centimetre increase over the past 24 hours brings Okanagan Lake to 342.612 metres, 0.132 m (5.19 inches) over the provincial full pool target and 0.639 m (2.09 feet) lower than the historic flood level set on June 9, 2017.

Outflows continue at near maximum capacity at 53.8 cubic metres per second into Okanagan River.

The observed snowpack is reporting at 97 cm this morning.

We have been asked by readers to provide comparisons to last year at this time.

In comparison to last year, the snowpack level was at 126 cm. We are currently 30 cm lower than May 23, 2017 was. 

Last year on May 23, 2017, we recorded a 4 cm increase to bring the level to 342.91 metres.

If there is more information you would like to see in the daily update or if you just want to provide feedback, you can email news@KelownaNow.com.

Link to our 2017 flood watch daily update story.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 23, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 23, 2018.

UPDATE: May 22, 2018 @ 6:45 a.m.

In the past 24 hours,Okanagan Lake saw a small 2.4 centimetre increase to bring the new level to 342.591 metres, which is 0.111 metres (4.36 inches) over the full pool target set by the province and 0.66 metres (2.164 feet) lower than the historic flood level of 2017.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 22, 2018.

Mission Creek is visibly lower. 

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 22, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 22, 2018.

Outflows have increased to 53.8 cubic metres per second at the Okanagan River reporting station. The graph below illustrates the outflows that were reduced starting on May 3, 2018 to lessen impact for Osoyoos and now increasing closer to maximum outflow starting on May 18, 2018. 

Graph: May 1, 2018 to May 22, 2018

The observed snowpack is reporting at 100.99 cm this morning. In comparison to last year, the level was at 132.99 cm. We are currently 32 cm lower than May 22. 2017 was. 

For comparison to last year's flooding, you can visit our 2017 flood coverage where we provided daily updates as well. Click this link and then scroll way down to get to the May 22, 2017 update.

UPDATE: May 21, 2018 @ 6:45 a.m.

Over the past 24 hours we have seen a 3 centimetre increase in Okanagan Lake which is again the lowest increase since May 3, 2018.  The new level is 342.567 metres, 0.087 metres (3.42 inches) over the deemed full pool target and 0.684 metres (2.24 feet) below the historic flood level of 343.251 metres.

Outflows continue at 47.5 cubic metres per second at the Okanagan River reporting station. The observed snowpack is reporting at 103.99 cm this morning. 

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 21, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 21, 2018.

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Central Okanagan Emergency Operations (CORD) reported yesterday that members of the Canadian Armed Forces, BC Wildfire contractors, municipal staff are working in Green Bay in West Kelowna installing flood protection measures, including work on private property, to protect key water, sewer and electrical public infrastructure. Unless work is required to ensure continuous protection of public infrastructure, private property owners are responsible for protection of their own property and should ensure flood protection measures are equivalent to what was put in place during last year’s flooding. Sand and sandbags locations are available at www.cordemergency.ca/map.

Region-wide flood protection measures that were put in place for possible creek flooding, including bladder dams and sandbags, are now being redeployed to areas vulnerable to lake flooding.

Boaters are asked to avoid creating wakes close to vulnerable shorelines. A boat’s wake can result in damaging wave action that can dismantle or impede flood protection measures. Boaters should refrain from travelling within 300 metres of the shoreline and make no wake.  Boaters are reminded that spring runoff has deposited significant debris in area lakes and to be extra vigilant for hazards.

We understand you are curious, but motorists and pedestrians are asked to avoid travelling to flood worksites. Increased traffic and pedestrian congestion impedes emergency personnel from effectively working. Traffic control personnel will turn all but local traffic away from active worksites.

Lake Level Report for Ellison and Kalmalka as of May 20, 2018:

Ellison Lake – 426.63 (full pool – 426.00)

Kalamalka Lake – 391.88 (full pool - 391.82)

UPDATE: May 20, 2018 @ 6:30 a.m.

The past 24 hour's 3.2 centimetre increase was the lowest increase to Okanagan Lake since May 3, 2018. The current level is now 342.537 metres, 0.057 metres (2.24 inches) over the full pool target set by the province to ensure adequate water supply through the summer.  We are 0.714 metres (2.34 feet) below the historic flood level of 2017. Okanagan Lake peaked last year on June 9, 2017 at 343.251 metres. You can click here to see the increases on a daily basis from last year around the same to the peak flood level. Last year at this time we started to see the increases drop off like we are starting to see this year. 

The observed snowpack level from the Mission Creek reporting station is now at 107.01 cm. The height of the snowpack from this reporting station this year was 242.01 cm on April 18, 2018, on May 1, 2018 it was at 188 cm.

The outflows have increased to 47.3 cubic metres per second compared to 39.8 cubic metres per second in yesterday's report. Outflows of Okanagan Lake had been reduced from 60 cubic metres per second in the first days of May to help alleviated flooding in Osoyoos. (illustrated in graph below) We published a story to help explain the current balancing act that is being done to lessen the impact of flooding south of us. (You can read that story hereThe intricate balancing act of flooding in the Okanagan)

Graph: Discharge levels to Okanagan River- May 1, 2018 to May 20, 2018

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 20, 2018.

Mission Creek appears visibly lower this morning at 6:00 a.m. 

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 20, 2018.

Boat launches throughout Okanagan Lake remain open, however boaters are cautioned that lake levels are high and they should watch for floating debris as a significant amount has been flowing downstream into area lakes. Boaters should also keep their distance from shorelines and keep speeds down as additional wave action could cause disturbance to banks and beaches.

Debris washed up on beaches and along the foreshore should be left there for the time being. The logs and other wood material will help limit erosion caused by wave action. When the flood risk has passed, officials will provide notification of how the beach debris will be removed.

UPDATE: May 19, 2018 @ 6:30 a.m.

Over the past 24 hours, Okanagan Lake increased 5.1 centimetres to 342.505 metres, which is 2.5 cm ( 0.984 inch) over the deemed full pool level. We are now 0.746 m (2.45 feet) away from the 2017 historic flood level of 343.251 m.

Outflows as of this morning are slightly higher at 39.8 cubic metres per second. 

The observed snowpack level at the Mission Creek reporting station is now showing 110.01 cm. 

We published a story this morning to help explain the current balancing act that is being done to lessen the impact of flooding south of us. (You can read that story hereThe intricate balancing act of flooding in the Okanagan)

Central Okanagan Emergency Operations (CORD) is now encouraging property owners along the waterfront prone to flooding or to damage due to flooding, to install protective measures for lake levels that could reach 2017 levels. 

Sand and sandbags locations throughout the Central Okanagan are available at www.cordemergency.ca/mapTo learn the correct method to fill sandbags.

CORD officials are receiving assistance from Canadian Forces personnel and B.C. Wildfire Services crews and contractors to protect key public infrastructures in low lying areas.

Flood prevention measures will continue to be deployed by Central Okanagan Emergency Operations officials based on risk to local infrastructure and public safety.

Emergency officials continue to conduct advance planning and prepare models for possible lake effect flooding, should Okanagan Lake rise to 2017 levels.

Boaters are encouraged to keep wakes levels low to minimize wave action along the waterfront to reduce the risk of erosion and damage to docks and other foreshore infrastructure. Debris washed up on beaches should be left for the time being, as logs and other wood material can help to limit erosion caused by wave action.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 19, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 19, 2018.

Graph: Jan 1, 2017 to May 19, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek bridge on Lakeshore Road 6:00 a.m. May 19, 2018.

The parking lot on the north side of Mission Creek at Lakeshore Road was open this morning and the barricades under the bridge have been removed. If you are walking along the creek, please ensure that you stay back from the banks and be extra cautious. 

Photo credit: Bob Muraschuk
Crews preparing in Penticton on Okanagan Lake

Photo credit: Bob Muraschuk
Crews preparing in Penticton on Okanagan Lake

Photo credit: Bob Muraschuk
Crews preparing in Penticton on Okanagan Lake

UPDATE: May 18, 2018 @ 4:50 p.m.

Okanagan Lake has reached its full pool level of 342.48 metres as of 1 p.m. today.

Crews continue to work on proactive flood protection measures across the Regional District of Central Okanagan.

The RDCO is also encouraging private property owners who could be at the risk of flooding to prepare their property for a lake level near last year's, as the ultimate precautionary measure.

UPDATE: May 18, 2018

As of this morning we are at 342.454 metres which is 2.6 centimetres below what is deemed full pool for Okanagan Lake. The change in the past 24 hours 4.4 cm, which is the lowest increase since May 4, 2018.

Outflows as of this morning are at 37.2 cubic metres per second. 

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 18, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 18, 2018.

Beware of debris in the water if you are out on the lake this long weekend. Click here for our story "Boaters urged to follow safety precautions this long weekend due to rising lake level."

Click here to read our story yesterday entitled "Okanagan Lake may come close to 2017’s historic flood level."

UPDATE: May 17, 2018  - Flooding focus now turns to Okanagan Lake

The new level for Okanagan Lake is now at 342.41 metres after a 5.5 centimetre rise in the past 24 hours. We are now 7 cm (2.7 inches) below the full pool level and 0.841 m (2.76 feet) below the historic flood level of 343.251 m. 

Outflows from Okanagan Lake are at the reduced level of 37.3 cubic metres per second due to flooding concerns in Osoyoos. 

Graph: April 1, 2018 to May 17, 2018 showing outflows of Okanagan Lake

Graph: Okanagan Lake level since Jan. 1, 2017.

Graph: Okanagan Lake levels since Jan. 1, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Rotary Beach on May 17, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 17, 2018.

The observed snowpack level at the Mission Creek reporting station as of May 17, 2018 is at 116.99 cm. 

UPDATE: May 16, 2018

Over the last 24 hours we have seen a 5.9 centimetre increase in Okanagan Lake levels bringing the current level to 342.355 metres. The new level is now 0.125 m (5.9 inches) lower than full pool and .896 m (2.94 feet) lower than last year's historic flood level.

City crews are now preparing to protect public infrastructure along the lakefront as focus has now turned to Okanagan Lake for flooding concerns.

KelownaNow published a story yesterday that you can view here, which compares the May 15 numbers from this year to 2017.  

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 16, 2018.

UPDATE: May 15, 2018

Okanagan Lake is now at 342.296 metres after a 6.1 centimetre increase in the past 24 hours. The new level is 0.184 m (7.2 inches) lower than the target of full pool and .955 m (3.13 feet) below the historic flood level of last year. 

According to Ed Henczel from Central Okanagan Emergency Operations, Mill Creek has peaked and as such KelownaNow will no longer be covering it in this story.

Mission Creek, however, has not yet peaked and could see another surge later this week with the warmer temperatures and rain in the forecast.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 15, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow

UPDATE: May 14, 2018

Over the last 24 hours we have seen a 6.2 cm increase in Okanagan Lake levels bringing the current level to 342.235 metres. The new level is now 0.245 metres (9.64 inches) lower than full pool and 1.016 metres (3.33 feet) lower than last year's historic flood level.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 14, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 14, 2018.

UPDATE: May 13, 2018

Okanagan Lake is now at 342.173 metres after a 5.8 centimetre increase in the past 24 hours. The new level is 0.307 m (1 foot) lower than the target of full pool and 1.078 m (3.53 feet) below the historic flood level of last year. 

We do expect the hot summer like weather to stick around for the next few days as a high pressure remains in place over Southern BC, keeping weather systems away for at the least a couple more days.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 13, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 13, 2018.

With the warmer temperatures, the snowpack is still a concern and as of this morning, the Mission Creek snowpack reporting station shows an observed snow depth of 138.99 cm compared to a depth 146.9 cm on May 11, 2018.

UPDATE: May 12, 2018 -  Lake level still rising but at a lower rate

Over the last 24 hours we have seen a 5.5 cm increase in Okanagan Lake levels bringing the current level to 342.115 metres. The new level is now 0.365 metres (1.197 feet) lower than full pool and 1.136 metres (3.73 feet) lower than last year's historic flood level.

This is the lowest increase in the Okanagan Lake we have seen in a while. 

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 12, 2018.

Photo Credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 12, 2018.

UPDATE: May 11, 2018 - Both Mill Creek and Mission Creek visibly lower this morning

Okanagan Lake's water level increased by 7.2 centimetres over the past 24 hours.

That brings the current level to 342.06 metres, 0.42 m (1.378 feet) below full pool and 1.191 m (3.906 feet) below the historic flood level of 2017.

Both Mission Creek and Mill Creek are visibly lower this morning. While the creek flows are visibly lower this morning we still have much of the snowpack to melt and there is warm weather on the way. The Mission Creek snowpack reporting station shows an observed snow depth of 146.9 cm. Last year on May 11, 2017 the snowpack observed depth was 149 cm.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 11, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 11, 2018.

Graph: Government of Canada - Okanagan Lake levels

UPDATE: May 10, 2018 - Mill Creek has spilled its banks

Okanagan Lake's water level increased by 8.8 centimetres over the past 24 hours.

That brings the current level to 341.988 metres, 0.492 m (1.614 feet) below full pool and 1.263 m (4.14 feet) below the historic flood level of 2017.

Both Mission Creek and Mill Creek are flowing fast and the public is warned to stay away from the banks of both creeks for their own safety.

Mill Creek has even started to spill its banks near Buckland Avenue, with some of the water leaking through sandbags and onto lawns.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 10, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 10, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 10, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 10, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 10, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 10, 2018.

UPDATE: May 9, 2018

Okanagan Lake's water level increased by 9 centimetres over the past 24 hours. That brings the current level to 341.90 metres, 0.58 m (1.902 feet) below full pool and 1.351 m (4.431 feet) below the historic flood level of 2017.

Heavy rain overnight didn't help matters, and while the worst of it looks to be over, there could still be a bit more of the wet stuff over the next day or two.

"Overnight rain will ease off Wednesday, and if we are lucky we will see a few sunny breaks behind the cold front," explains Wesla English, NowMedia meteorologist. "However, because of the unstable air mass, showers will remain possible in the afternoon. Daytime highs will be noticeably cooler Wednesday and Thursday in the teens."

Shaun Reimer said on Monday afternoon during a conference call that that they did have to temporarily cuts flows from Okanagan Lake dam because of issues with Okanagan River flows in the Oliver area. The reduction in flow is a short term drop. He said they will wait until the the rainy period passes and then they will reassess. 

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 9, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 9, 2018.

UPDATE: May 8, 2018

Okanagan Lake's water level increased by 7 centimetres over the past 24 hours. That brings the current level to 341.81 metres, 0.67 m (2.198 feet) below full pool and 1.441 m (4.726 feet) below the historic flood level of 2017.

Kelowna declared a precautionary citywide state of local emergency on Monday to give emergency crews access to private properties that may need to be outfitted with flood protection measures.

The monthly snow pack report also came out and it's less than ideal, as the region is dealing with levels more than 200% above normal, the highest since records started being kept in 1980.

Graph Credit: Government of Canada
Lake levels: Jan 1, 2017 to May 8, 2018

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 8, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 8, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 8, 2018.

UPDATE: May 7, 2018

The Okanagan Lake level increased by 5.3 cm over the past 24 hours bringing the current level to 341.740 metres, 0.74 (2.427 feet) below full pool and 1.511 metres (4.956 feet) below the historic flood level of 2017.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 7, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 7, 2018.

UPDATE: May 6, 2018

In the past 24 hours, Okanagan Lake has risen 4.5 cm to make the level this morning 341.687 metres.  The two photos below show the levels at Mission Creek and Mill Creek. We have been taking the photos at the same time every morning and recording the lake level at the same time every morning. On the Mission Creek photos, the stairs to the creek provide a good visual for creek levels. 

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 6, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 6, 2018.

UPDATE: May 5, 2018

Our update for May 5, 2018 shows an increase of 4 cm to bring the level to 341.642 metres, 0.838 metres (2.749 feet) below what is deemed to be a full pool for Okanagan Lake. We are 1.61 metres (5.277 feet) lower than the historic flood levels of last year. 

Mill Creek starting spilling its banks on the night of May 4th last year.  

It’s the 1-year anniversary of the flooding event that hit the community last year. Click here for the story. 

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 5, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 5, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Okanagan Lake looking towards Hotel Eldorado

UPDATE: May 4, 2018

Mission Creek flows have increased in the past 24 hours with the warmer temperatures melting the high elevation snowpack. We have seen a 4.2 cm increase in the past 24 hours for Okanagan Lake. The new level is now 341.602 metres, still 0.878 metres (2.88 feet) below the full pool target and 1.649 (5.41 feet) below the historic flood level of 2017.

Earlier this week, the City of Kelowna said that they are continuing to prepare for spring runoff by increasing creek capacity and working with the BC Wildfire Service to place flood protection along creeks.

Mill Creek has been the main focus of flood protection measures.These include placement of bladder dams, sandbags and the raising of some pedestrian pathways. Crews have also been working on thinning tree brush and debris along the waterway.

Dredging, along with tree and deadfall removal below the high-water mark in Mill Creek, was permitted by the provincial government for the first time in a number of years.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 4, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at the Buckland Avenue on May 4, 2018.

UPDATE: May 3, 2018

Okanagan Lake levels saw a 2.3 cm increase over the past 24 hours. The current level is now at 341.560 metres. 

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at Buckland Avenue on May 3, 2018 at 6:30 am.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge on May 3, 2018.

UPDATE: May 2, 2018

Lake levels increased by 2 cm over the past 24 hour period. The new level is now at 341.537 metres, well below the full pool target of 342.38 metres and way below the record high set last year of 343.251 metres.

Graph: Government of Canada - Jan 1, 2017 to May 2, 2018

UPDATE: May 1, 2018

As of May 1, 2018, the level of Okanagan Lake is at 341.517 metres, a 1.3 cm rise over the last 24 hours. We are 0.963 metres (3.159 feet) from the full pool target and 1.734 metres (5.688 feet) from the record high flood level of last year. 

KelownaNow went out to talk with Bruce Smith from the Emergency Operations Centre on Monday for a better understanding of where the focus is right now. 

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at Buckland Avenue at 6:30 a.m. on May 1, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek at the Lakeshore bridge at 6:30 a.m. on May 1, 2018.

UPDATE: April 30, 2018

Okanagan Lake levels as of Monday morning are at 341.504 metres, a 0.01 metre (1 cm) increase over yesterday's 341.494 metre reading. This is a small increase over the previous day's ( 3 cm) rise. 

UPDATE: April 29, 2018

Okanagan Lake levels as of Sunday morning are at 341.494 metres, a 0.03 metre (3 cm) increase over yesterday's 341.464 metre reading. The graph below the photos illustrates the increased creek flows now adding to the lake levels faster than the managed dam system can drain. We are still well below the target level of what is deemed to be a full pool.  

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek on April 29, 2018 at the Lakeshore bridge.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mill Creek at Buckland Avenue on April 29, 2018.

Understanding the numbers

Current level on April 29, 2018 is 341.494 metres.

Full pool or the target level for Okanagan Lake is 342.480 metres.

Record lake level on June 9, 2017 was 343.251 metres. 

For those needing a conversion link, click here. 

Snowpack levels for the Okanagan: 152% above normal as of April 1, 2018. 

The Okanagan watershed explained.

Mission Creek flows have increased over the past few days with the warmer temperatures. 

Central Okanagan Emergency Operations said on Thursday that the lake is not a concern for them at this time

Graph: Government of Canada - Jan 1, 2018 to April 29, 2018.

UPDATE: April 28, 2018

Okanagan Lake levels as of Saturday morning are at 341.464 metres, a 0.022 metre (2.2 cm) increase over yesterday's 341.442 metre reading.

UPDATE: April 27, 2018

Okanagan Lake levels as of this morning are at 341.442 metres, a 0.014 m (1.4 cm) increase over yesterday's 341.428m reading.

In our update yesterday, we suggested that we may have seen the start of the upward trend in lake levels as creek inflows start to outmatch the ability to drain the lake with the managed dam system.  

However, Central Okanagan Emergency Operations said on Thursday that the lake is not a concern for them at this time

Understanding the numbers

Full pool or the target level for Okanagan Lake is 342.48 metres.

Current level on April 27, 2018 is 341.442 m.

Record lake level on June 9, 2017 was 343.251 m. 

The record flood level last year was 1.809 m (5.935 feet) above today's current level and we are currently 1.038 (3.405 ft) metres below the full pool target.

Snowpack levels for the Okanagan: 152% above normal as of April 1, 2018. 

The Okanagan watershed explained.

Okanagan Lake is currently draining at maximum capacity.

Mission Creek flows have increased over the past few days with the warmer temperatures. 

Graph: Government of Canada - Jan 1 - Apr 27, 2018

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Mission Creek bridge on Lakeshore on April 27, 2018.

Photo credit: KelownaNow
Homes beside the Mission Creek Bridge on Lakeshore, April 27, 2018.

UPDATE: April 26, 2018
Okanagan Lake levels have been on a managed decline since the early part of February in preparation for the annual snowpack melt. The graph below shows the levels on a fairly consistent decline with the last few days showing a bottoming as creek flows have started to increase with the warmer temperatures melting the snowpack. 

Graph: Government of Canada - Shows Okanagan Lake levels above base from Jan 1 to Apr 26.

Understanding the numbers

Full pool or the target level for Okanagan Lake is 342.48 metres.

Current level on April 26, 2018 is 341.428 metres.

Record lake level on June 9, 2017 was 343.251 metres. 

The record flood level last year was 1.823 metres (5.98 feet) above today's current level and we are currently 1.052 (3.45 feet) metres below the full pool target.

Snowpack levels for the Okanagan: 152% above normal as of April 1, 2018. 

The Okanagan watershed explained.

Okanagan Lake is currently draining at maximum capacity.

Mission Creek flows have increased over the past few days with the warmer temperatures. 

Graph: Government of Canada - Mission Creek Discharge levels



As of today, Apr. 26, the level of Okanagan Lake is holding at 341.428 metres. Kelowna is now seeing the warmest temperatures so far for this year. This week, temperatures are expected to hit the mid-20s.

The warmer air is due to an upper ridge of high pressure, according to meteorologist, Wesla English. The sun and warmth will last until the weekend. Signs point to a pattern change Saturday,  meaning there's a chance of precipitation this weekend.

Shaun Reimer continues to operate the Penticton Dam at its maximum rate of 60 cubic metres per second.

This graph compares last spring's levels to this year's current conditions (from Jan. 2017 to Apr. 2018).

This graph shows the lake levels from Jan. 2017 to Apr. 2018 and demonstrates the difference in levels between this spring and last spring.

By now, Reimer says, the mid-elevation is starting to flow into the rivers and residents should expect some higher volume in those low-lying areas.

It's what he calls the "natural condition."

Government of Canada
The current Okanagan Lake levels from Apr. 1, 2018 to Apr. 24, 2018.

For the past two months, Reimer's been dropping the lake by about half a centimetre every day.

NowMedia will continue to track the levels of Okanagan Lake every day during the spring and summer season. The daily recording is taken at 4:30 a.m. 

We'll be checking in with Reimer throughout the spring runoff season as he continues to manage the outflow of Okanagan Lake. 

Okanagan Lake's full pool level is at 342.48 metres.

Last year, the lake reached its highest level at 343.251 m, on June 9, 2017.

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